.NET Core 3 Preview 4: Use UWP Controls in WPF with XAML Islands

In this blog post, you will learn how to use XAML Islands to host the UWP MapControl in a .NET Core 3 Preview 4 WPF application.

XAML Islands is a technology that allows you to host modern UWP controls in your WPF, Windows Forms, and Win32 applications. You can use for example UWP’s InkCanvas or the MapControl, or you can use your custom UWP Controls. This allows you to modernize your apps with Windows 10 features.

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Using Git in Visual Studio has never been easier than in Visual Studio 2019

Visual Studio 2019 has many fantastic new features. Some of these features like the new start window make the use of Git in Visual Studio 2019 way easier than in the previous versions. Do you want to learn how to use Git in Visual Studio 2019?

Check out my new Pluralsight course

In my new Pluralsight course Using Git for Source Control in Visual Studio 2019, you will learn how to use Git in Visual Studio 2019 while working on a .NET application in the context of a small team.

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Calling the Azure Event Hub REST-API – from UWP, WPF and any other .NET (Core) Client

To push events into Azure Event Hub you can use the Nuget-package WindowsAzure.ServiceBus (https://www.nuget.org/packages/WindowsAzure.ServiceBus/). That package works pretty straight forward, but there’s one problem:

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The future of Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and what’s coming next

In 2006 I started working with the first preview versions of the Windows Presentation Foundation with my Trivadis fellow Christoph Pletz. We wrote 2007 the very first German article about MVVM and 2008 I published my first book with the title “Windows Presentation Foundation – the ultimate handbook”.

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How-to deploy the Crystal Reports Basic Runtime that’s included in Visual Studio 2008

This week I’ve to deploy an ASP.NET application containing about 20 reports that have been created with the Crystal Reports Basic Runtime which is included in Visual Studio 2008. (By the way, the application also contains a lot of AJAX-Functionality. It uses the "AJAX Control Toolkit-based" MultiColumnDropDown that I’ve described in a previous post).

When deploying the application to a different machine than your developer-machine, the Crystal Report Basic Runtime must be deployed also. You do that by copying the necessary msi-file to the server and run it. The "necessary" .msi-file is already on your development machine and were installed with Visual Studio 2008. The .msi-files for different plattforms are located in the following paths:

Runtime | MSI-Location
(x86) C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Bootstrapper\Packages\CrystalReports10_5\CRRedist2008_x86.msi
(x64) C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Bootstrapper\Packages\CrystalReports10_5\CRRedist2008_x64.msi
(IA64)

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Crystal Reports\CRRedist\IA64\CRRedist2008_ia64.msi

(the table above is contained in MSDN-documentation here)

The installation is very simple. You doesn’t need to click anything, simply run the .msi and you see the window below. Just wait until it closes.

crystalReportsBasic

There’s also the possibility to include the msi in your setup-application. For more information on that take a look at this thread in MSDN-Forums.

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