Kick it like Beckham with WPF Animations

I’m just finishing the Animation-Chapter of my German-speaking WPF book (WPF-Buch erscheint im Juni 2008). I had a hard time to find a good idea how to show the reader animations in a really "non-boring", but easy way. And I think I’ve found one.

Animations in WPF are really powerful. You can create them completely in XAML. (more…)

Read more...

Give your blog-code the "Visual Studio"-look

How do you write a blog-entry with code that has the same syntax-highlightning like Visual Studio has? I mean this look:

<Code>
<Code.Style>
<Style TargetType="{x:Type Code}">
<Setter Property="IsReallyGoodReadable" Value="Yes"/>
</Style>
</Code.Style>
</
Code>

There are many different blug-ins. But only a few get the code exactly look like in Visual Studio. To get your code looking like the code above, you have to do 2 steps (with a small 3rd css-step):

1. Install Live Writer: http://get.live.com/WL/config_all – LiveWriter is a tool for writing blog entries offline

2. Go to the Live Gallery and download the "Paste from Visual Studio add in": Link to the Paste-Plugin

In LiveWriter you can paste the code direct from visual studio by clicking on the link of the plugin. After you’ve written your entry, you upload it, edit it online and finally publish it.

Special things for Firefox:

In Firefox the fontsize of the code is much smaller than in Internet Explorer 7. Fortunately the pasted code is inside a pre-Tag. The pre-Tags’ class-Attribut is set to "code". So you can easily point to the "code" in your css and give the font a fixed size, and it’ll look equal in Firefox and Internet Explorer.

3. The css-Step

I’ve set the fontsize in the css-File of my WordPress theme to 10. The gray background of the code and the dotted border is also specified in my css.

Just past the following in your css to make the code exactly looking like the snippet above and the css-snippet itself:

.code
{
font-family: Courier New;
font-size: 10pt;
background-color: #EEEEEE;
margin: 0px;
padding: 5px;
border: dotted 1px #CCCCCC;
}

Tips: It’s a good practice to enter all linebreaks in Visual Studio before you paste the code into LiveWriter. I normally paste and delete and paste and delete and so on… until it fits. Find more tips on Karl Shifflets blog

Thanks to: Luca Bolognese and Charlie Calvert from Microsoft. They linked me to the plugin. Thanks also to Karl Shifflet who initiated this entry.

I hope this entry helps you to write your post with this format. How do you paste your code today? Do you know other plugins that give your blog-code the Visual Studio-look?

Read more...

Working with the XmlDataProvider

The XmlDataProvider class enables Binding to XML inside XAML. This will allow you to bind e.g. to the rss feed of a blog like http://www.thomasclaudiushuber.com/blog/feed/, cause rss is simple XML.

A XmlDataProvider-Element is declared as a logic resource. You simply set the Source-Property to a XML-Document and optionally (more…)

Read more...

Rocking with Ibanez RG550 20th Anniversary

I’ve waited about nearly one year for the Ibanez RG550 20th Anniversary (it’s my third guitar). The first time I got it, the pickup had a defective contact. The second time I got it, the pickup had still the same problem. Now I got it the third time (and that’s nearly after one year), and it works fine:

 ibanez

I’m really glad that this long running order process came to a good end, cause this is really a great guitar. For the last few days I have mostly played one of my favorite songs, Metallica’s cover version of Thin Lizzy’s "Whiskey in the Jar". And today I decided to write the first 2008-blog entry about my new guitar and rename my blog to ".NET Rocker" :-)

Read more...

TechEd Developers 2007 in retrospect – Monday

Last week I went to Barcelona for five days, participating at TechEd Developers 2007 (05. – 09. november). In the following posts I’ll just show you a short summary of my experience at TechEd Developers 2007. Let’s start on Monday.

On Monday the Keynote-Session started after a life grafiti-show with some really breaking news presented by S. Somasegar (Microsofts Corporate Vice President of the developer division):

  • Visual Studio 2008 and .NET 3.5 will be available to MSDN subscribers by the end of November
  • The first CTP of Microsofts Sync Framework is available now
  • For those of you using Microsoft Popfly, a new Popfly Explorer will be available
  • This year there will already be a CTP of the next Version of Visual Studio, called “Rosario”. In 2008 there will be a Beta of it

That are great news, especially the release of Visual Studio 2008 before the end of November. In fact Visual Studio 2008 really differs from the Visual Studio versions we had before. It’s the first time you can build applications that target different Framework Versions. With Visual Studio 2008 you can build applications that target .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0 or even .NET 3.5. This feature is called Multi-Targeting, and its possible, because .NET 2.0, .NET 3.0 and .NET 3.5 are all using the same Common Language Runtime, the CLR 2.0 that was introduced with .NET 2.0. Of course another great feature is the possibility to debug into the .NET Framework source code. A great possibility to learn some new best practices and to look how Microsoft has done it

The Microsoft Sync Framework is a new platform for enabling roaming, offline and collaboration across your applications, services and devices. The Framework also contains built-in support for synchronizing relational databases, NTFS and FAT file systems, etc. Get some more infos and the first CTP of it here.

After the Keynote-Session I joined the Session A Tour of Visual Studio 2008 and the .NET Framework 3.5, speaker Daniel Moth. Daniel explained that the .NET Framework 3.5 is a superset of .NET 3.0 (and so still uses the CLR 2.0). He showed some great features of the new IDE, like the new refactoring features added to the contextmenu in the codeeditor, or the transparency-feature for the intellisense-Window. You can make the intellisense-Window transparent by pressing the Ctrl-Key. So you can look at your code while leaving the intellisense-window open. Daniel also explained the terms of the green and red bits in a really good manner. Green bits are those assemblies that are new in .NET 3.5, and haven’t existed in .NET 3.0. Red bits are those assemblies that already existed in .NET 3.0, but are lightly extended and fixed with an installation of .NET 3.5. The Red bits are called “red”, because they describe a difficulty. If your .NET 3.0 application takes advantage of a not well implemented feature (maybe call it a bug :-)) in .NET 3.0 and that bug will be fixed with .NET 3.5, your application won’t work correctly anymore when you change this bug/feature by installing .NET 3.5. So microsoft has to be very careful with the red bits that are shipped as part of .NET 3.5. From the green and red bits you could also conclude something about the installation of .NET 3.5:

  • If you have .NET 3.0 already installed, an installation of .NET 3.5 will use this existing installation and change the red bit assemblies (some existing .NET 3.0 assemblies) and add some brand new Assemblies (the green bits). That means, after the installation of .NET 3.5 you wont come back to .NET 3.0, but every .NET 3.0 application should run well on .NET 3.5 (if Microsoft has done a good job with the red bits)
  • If you haven’t .NET 3.0 installed, an installation of .NET 3.5 will install whole .NET 3.0, plus the red and green bits of .NET 3.5

As the last session on Monday, I joined the session A Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) Walkthrough using Visual Studio 2008, but it wasn’t really as amazing as I thought before. The only new stuff for me about WCF I got out of this session were the things that ship with Visual Studio 2008, but nothing about WCF itself. In Visual Studio 2008 there will be new Project-Templates to generate a WCF-Library and a new UI that allows you to test your services easily.

In the evening, the “Ask The Experts” was open. The first thing I was looking for was an “Ask The Experts to WPF”-stand. But I didn’t find one. There were stands with experts in Visual Studio 2008, SQL Server, BI, Office, Silverlight and Expression and many more, but no stand with experts in WPF. So I just went to the Silverlight stand and asked for the WPF stand. The guy pointed to another person and said: “He asked me exactly the same questions 10 seconds ago, unfortunately there is no stand with WPF-experts”. And the other person said, “Some questions about WPF?”. Yeah, I thought, here I was right. Looking at his name, I recognized the name of the person and I knew, here I’m really right. It was Ian Griffiths, author of the very first WPF-book, “Programming WPF”, currently in its second edition. We spoke about nearly 1 hour about developing real enterprise applications with WPF, about the WPF-Designer in Visual Studio and about using Blend for designing your app. In most cases, Ian and I had the same opinion, and we both are waiting for the datagrid as part of .NET/WPF. :-) Today there are only third-party-grids available from famous control authors like those from Infragistics. Even in .NET 3.5 and WPF 3.5 (it’s really called WPF 3.5 and not WPF 1.5), Microsoft introduced no more 2D-Controls. But WPF 3.5 contains some new 3D-Elements like UIElement3D or Viewport2DVisual3D, that receive Input Events and make interactive 3D much easier than in WPF 3.0.

Read more...

The first one

Today I decided to start my own blog. So far I enjoyed life just as a blog-reader for the last couple of years. But now there are several reasons to start my own blog:

  • Up to now I just played around with WPF for nearly two years, and I discovered some things I want to share with you
  • I want to post some technical content to find it later again. Also the provider guarantees me a backup of my site. :-)
  • A blog is a great platform to communicate with you and other guys working with .NET, WPF, XAML, C#, LINQ, …

During the next days I’ll provide some stuff just heared and learned from TechEd 2007 in Barcelona.
So stay tuned…

Read more...